All posts tagged hat

Mon. Feb. 14. 10. 0’c PM [1944]

St. Valentine’s Day. I remember some of my young aunts having valentines set out on their dressing-tables when I was small. Went to Sk[egness] this morning altho’ it rained. Only a little drizzle while we were there. Got stockings for Jean. Says they are too dark so may change, she having those I got from Pontings. I have a bad pain under my left shoulder, don’t know whether it is asthma coming on or just indigestion as it comes and goes. I took Ron’s light hat to be dyed and reblocked for myself. Dark maroon, don’t know if it will be a success as woman in shop said it would not make a very big one. Of course I don’t want a very big one but don’t want one with no brim. Changed library book. Mr Middleton’s “Our Village” was not in, so got one by Georgette Hayer not one that Emmie recommended as they had not got them or they were out. Had an A.M.L. [air mail letter] from Ron Sat written Feb. 2. He had got mine written Jan 19th. He is fit and well.

Ted B[rown] and Bessie came Sun afternoon. B. engaged but says not going to be married until after the war. Well I’ve heard those tales before, she may or may not. We all went to Chapel on Sun. night. A lot of Welsh soldiers were there so the singing was very good. Afterwards they went to Cen. Hall for tea and cakes and a sing-song. Father and I did not go, but Jean did and came home with Elsie. Called at G’ma’s, Chris [Lammiman] was there, he is growing a nice little fair moustache. The boys are growing up.

Better news from Italy yesterday and to-day but the struggle is very fierce. Gers over Eng. last night about 50. Some damage and cas[ualties]. About 15 got to London but no bombs dropped. B. Brown is going to Wales when she goes back from leave, near to Bangor, for a course, she is a L[ance] corporal now.

Mr Middleton, named as author of Our Village, was probably NOT one of the local Middletons (see 11 Oct 1942), but may have been the broadcaster CH Middleton: The ‘World’s first television gardening programme’, In Your Garden, With Mr Middleton, had been broadcast by the BBC in 1936. On radio he launched the ‘Dig for Victory’ campaign in September 1939.

Georgette Heyer (1902 -1974) was a popular British author who specialised in historical romance – especially the Regency period- and detective fiction.

Have you read an introduction to May Hill & family (includes photographs) and explored ‘The Casualties Were Small’?

Fri. Feb. 4 8.30 a.m [1944]

Father set off on Patrol at 8.15 and I took down the black-out at once. It is a clear cold morning, more like winter weather than it has been for some time. It blew half a gale when Jean started for school at 8 o’c but the wind dropped suddenly and there is very little now. Think it took the darkness with it as it is the lightest morning we have had, that is, light the earliest. It is almost north tho’ so we may get it dry or we may get some snow. We had a letter from Ron on Wed and 2 more yesterday, one Jean’s. Rene also had one, but they were all written in Dec. He has got “Mr Chips” and read it, was very pleased with it. He had a very nice Xmas. Slippers for Father finished, they are not at all bad and will do until he gets more coupons. Much better than having to wear his boots at night by the fire. They are rather large but he says they are comfortable.

Went to Sk[egness] on Wed. Hat shop took Father’s to clean and reblock. They can only take them for an hour, first three days of week again now and as mine may have to be dyed and certainly re-shaped they dare not take it, we were too late on Wed. Father got round them however to reshape his. He got his fountain pen but it was only 9/2. They said they were reliable at that price. He bought two, one for my birthday. It is a very nice one and I am pleased to have it tho’ I should not have bothered about one so long as this would write. It is quite good since I had new nib and was only a cheap one to start with. Ron got it at Naffi [NAAFI] when he was at Binbrook. Rene got a very nice blouse and we paid 9/6 for year’s subs[cription] at Boots’ Library. Books can be changed at any time, and there is no restriction as to time of keeping them out. I got another writing-pad and envelopes at Dutt[on]‘s. I use a lot.

Had another letter from Mrs. Fletcher. She really wants to come back any time if we can get a suitable house, but quite realises we are not obliged to move. It makes us feel unsettled tho’. I have written to Mr Vamplew to see if he wants to let Bung[alow] next to Rodwell’s if suitable, but we shall not move yet unless we do find a suitable house. I would prefer to be nearer the Chapel if possible.

Mr Vamplew, a builder, of Friskney owned several adjacent bungalows, near ‘Point Farm’, including ‘Peacehaven’ and the one which had been occupied by Warners (see 2 Feb 1944).

Rodwell was a senior Navy officer, based at ‘Royal Arthur’. The bungalow was one of those owned by Mr Vamplew.

Have you read an introduction to May Hill & family (includes photographs) and explored ‘The Casualties Were Small’?