All posts tagged Grandma

Thurs Nov 18/43 8.15 a.m. [1943]
# PLANES RETURNING EARLY MORNING
# DRESSED CHICKEN PRICED
# NEWS FROM A NOTTINGHAM FAMILY
# GREAT NIECE MAIZIE AND BABY RETURN

It is bright and clear and cold this morning tho’ it was hailing when we went to bed and I heard rain or hail in the night. There is a morning moon, when it is waned the mornings will seem very dark, still it is only 5 weeks to Xmas and the shortest day. Jean has gone to school. Just as she was going a lot of planes came over, probably returning from or setting out for a raid. Jean thought returning as they were heading more inland than towards the sea. “Snip” is washing herself after a plate of porage. I told her it was hot and she carefully skirted round the edges of the plate but very soon finished it. The animals always seem hungry these cold days. We had another rabbit yesterday, it was very good indeed as they are in cold weather. Sent Mrs Leivers word how much her fowl was. It weighed 7 lbs with feathers off, just over I think, and is 1/10 lb so charged 13/0. There is not supposed to be any profiteering but there always seems to be a loophole. Fowls, young and old are 1/4 live weight but 1/10 with feathers off so in a good fowl they get over 2/0 for that. Then if they take insides out and head and legs off they can charge up to 2/6 lb.

Had a letter from Mrs. L. Lees yesterday, it was a long time since she had written. Joan is married (she sent a PG [photograph] of group). She [Joan] will be 29 I think. They all look very nice. Len looks about 70 but Mrs. L is getting plump and looks quite young. Rosemary is 19 in WAAFs [Women’s Auxiliary Air Force], she looks quite the modern young miss, is as tall as her father and fat too. Anne and Susan look very nice in their bridesmaids dresses, Joan was not in white but looked very nice in short dress. Billy has been in India and Ceylon for two years. I think he is a Lieut. now. Want to know if we can send them fowls for Xmas. Nothing doing. Now we are not in the trade it’s not worthwhile.

Have fitted Jean’s skirt, think it will look very nice. Cut out a velveteen dog last night, and did some of my cardigan. Rene washed a few clothes for me, we did not put them out, but have got them dry indoors. There is very little wind now, it seems very quiet. Father took Gran to Aunt Mary’s yesterday when he came from Sk[egness]. She is staying there a few days. Jean said Maisie and baby and Cis were on bus’ Tue night. I believe she is coming to live with Con for the present. Ben is away for some months. She was with Mary but babies make too much untidiness for Mary. It’s a pity she hasn’t one or two.

Anne and Susan Lees, not mentioned previously, were presumably younger children of Mr and Mrs Lees (see 16 Dec 1940), and bridesmaids at their sister Joan’s wedding.

Aunt Mary, with whom Grandma was staying, was Charles Hill’s wife, Jean’s aunt.

Ben McGuigan, Maizie’s husband (see 22 Mar 1942), was at sea, serving in the Royal Navy. At one time he served on HMS Aurora.

Mary Blythe (married name), with whom Maizie and baby had temporarily stayed, was a sister of Ciss and Connie. She was a teacher, living near Grimsby, who never had children of her own.

Have you read an introduction to May Hill & family (includes photographs) and explored ‘The Casualties Were Small’?

Oct 15 Friday 10. 45. P.M. [1943]
# DIARY RESUMED AFTER THREE WEEKS
# GRANDMA’S TROUBLE-FREE VISIT
# CANTAKEROUS AUNT JET A CHALLENGE
# CHEERFUL LETTERS FROM RON

“We don’t miss anything in the world as much as we miss our burdens” from Palludia by Anna Robeson Burr.

We seem to have been very busy since I last wrote in my diary. G.ma came on 27th (Mon) in the afternoon. Rene and I had washed in the morning. She stayed until Friday aft. She is very quiet and eats so very little. I was pretty well while she was here but in bed until tea-time on the Sunday. Oct 4.

Went to Trusthorpe on Thur. (Jean and I) and Aunt J[et] came back with us vowing she was so ill-treated she would never return. Aunt Fanny Robinson was there but even that did not keep her at home. Aunt F is nearly 80 and getting frail but not blind like Aunt J. She has a nature too, very much different. I can see now that mother was much more like her in many ways, tho’ she was always thought to be most like Aunt J in looks. Aunt J is very trying, and after a week of her we took her back to Amy yesterday, indeed she refused to stay any longer tho’ I would have kept her over the week-end if she would have stayed. I could not cope with her long tho’. Poor Amy, no wonder she seems apathetic at times.

Aunt Jet with late husband Tom

Aunt Jet with late husband Tom

Aunt J is cantankerous and cross-opple-ed and even worse, but I think her mind is warped or gradually weakening. She eats far too much, Jean and I reckoned up one day and she had 9 meals and snacks in the 12 hours 8 a.m to 8.p.m. Still we got along as well or better than I expected, as I am a bit irritable and crotchety myself at times. We had a “fratch” or two when I got my foot in it, and when I did I put in a few words for her to think over at leisure, hoping they might react to Amy’s benefit. One tea-time, after getting it ready an hour before time, I had to re-sugar and re-milk her tea, still it wasn’t right, it needed more sugar (she had a whole lb in her tea and malted food in the week) more hot water and more milk still. Says me, “Your cup is full now” but it was “too hot to drink” so much exasperated I said, “Blow on it then, or wait until it cools”. She shut up, got her tea quite amiably and finally remarked to Rene, “what a good cup it was”, almost upsetting Rene’s equilibrium. Still, it was queer how I missed her last night and to-day, which is probably why the quotation at the beginning of to-day’s entry struck me when reading tonight.

Father is on watch, Jean and I are in bed, Jean has been to L.G.B. [Girls’ Life Brigade G.L.B.] and I am very tired. We are relieved to have had 7 letters from Ron this week, latest dated 21 Sep. Very cheerful too.

Anna Robeson Brown Burr was an American novelist/ essayist. ‘Palludia’ was published by Duffield & Company, New York, 1928.

Aunt Fanny, née Thorpe, Robinson, the widow of George Albert Robinson, was the eldest sister of May’s mother and Aunt Jet.

Have you read an introduction to May Hill & family (includes photographs) and explored ‘The Casualties Were Small’?

Sun Sep. 26 8. 45. p.m. [1943]
# SOOTHING MUSIC ON WIRELESS
# COASTGUARDS’ OTHER ACTIVITIES
# QUIET BOARDER MOVES ON
# BATTLE OF BRITAIN THANKSGIVING
# LOCAL BOMBING

Albert Sandler is playing his violin. I love his playing. He plays as if he loved it and would play his very best either with or without an audience. Rene thinks he has a bit of a “murky” past but he must have some good spots I think. His music soothes and rests me and makes one feel better I think. It does not seem to spoil the Sunday evening atmosphere as so much of the radio trash does. So much of what we hear is so far beneath the intelligence of people no more educated than us that I wonder it is ever tolerated. It could so easily help to improve people’s taste instead of lowering it and I don’t mean high-brow stuff either, tho’ I think it should be broadcast in its turn too. At least it would not debase.

Father has done an hour’s watch from 7 to 8 for Joe Kirk tonight and then is doing 3 more until 11 o’c for Hallgarth as it is his birthday forsooth! Time he grew up at his age. Gilbert Paul is taking over Matt. Stones’ wheelwrights’ business. Joe Kirk had a cow calve on Friday. Yesterday he found it dead with its head in a ditch. It had broken a blood vessel. 3rd calf and worth £60, in fact he was bidden that in the morning. Bull calf only worth £2. Of course it wasn’t insured.

My boarder went this morning. Father took him to catch 10.15. train to Sk[egness]. He was going to Leicester and said it would be 8 pm when he arrived at home. Travelling is so bad now especially on Sun. He came on Tuesday evening, is a friend of Beryl Cousins and was only here for breakfast and dinner and to sleep. I charged him 7/6 a day. He tipped me 5/0 and Father 2/6 at St[ation]. He was no trouble and ate anything set before him. On Sat. I gave him 2 eggs for breakfast (he always started with porridge) and when I took them in he said “There now, look at that.” He was very quiet and not given to exclamations either. He was so quiet that we did not always hear him come in tho’ he was never very late, (we did not wait up as he was a friend of Cousins, so alright) but alas the loose board at the top of the stairs always betrayed him as it used to Ron and Emmie. G.ma is coming tomorrow for a few days as Father is still patrolling. Jean told her it would be quite alright as I could put her into the “lodger’s” bed as it was and save sheets as he was a very clean young man! However, G.ma doesn’t mind a joke and knows Jean.

Our Michaelmas daisies are lovely now in the jars Emmie and Ron gave me. I don’t put them in the jars direct, but into vases first. Chrysanths will soon be out if weather keeps open. It is Battle of Britain Sunday. Thanksgiving for miraculous deliverances of Britain in 1940. I am afraid we are not much for parades at Chapel but the Red + did parade. I think it was a pity the church and chapel were not full. I intended going tonight but the N. wind was so bitter I did not. One thing I have thought of to-day. How very little we knew at the time, of the terrible “Battle of Britain” down here. Most of what we know we have learned since. The few pictures in paper, little news broadcast, told us very little. On Thursday night this week a Jerry plane or planes dropped a number of anti-personnel bombs round Anderby way and on Grantham’s land too. Some few have been found. Have written to Ron and enclosed poem, Little House. It may amuse him a few minutes. Have also written to Sybil. Must write to Frank soon and cookie Jock too. Grace settling down I think at Revesby. Roy home on leave, Joan still not at all well. Jean said Ralph and wife (Helen) at chapel this morning. Peter Kirk is on leave, he looks a long blue sailor and his head still pokes forward on his long neck. Mrs Leivers called Monday afternoon. She was staying in Sk. has not altered much but looks older.

Albert Sandler, violinist, was a popular light orchestra leader before and during World War II.

Matthew Stones’ wheelwright business was in Ingoldmells.

Beryl Cousins was the granddaughter of the elderly Mr and Mrs Cousins (see 9 May 1943).

Helen Faulkner was the wife of Ron’s village friend Ralph.

Have you read an introduction to May Hill & family (includes photographs) and explored ‘The Casualties Were Small’?

Sat Sep. 4/43 9.o’c
# WILL DUE FOR WEEK’S COASTGUARD LEAVE
# GRANDMA INVITED TO STAY
# PHOTOS REPRINTED FOR RON AND EMMIE

No fresh news from Italy. Jean has just been to Gma’s to take brambles Rene brought for Eff. and to tell G.ma Father is starting 6 days holiday? to-day and to ask her if she would like to come. She doesn’t say yet. Father is on watch but is being released at 10 by Mr Parish as he has to go to the station. The rush of station work will soon be over I expect.

Eff sent me eggs to-day. I did not expect them as Den[nis] is at home. I sent Ron an A.M.L [air mail letter] yesterday. Also sent snaps to be reprinted and sent Emmie the first of hers, wonder if she will like it. I don’t think we take enough time posing before the actual “smile please” or we forget to take the whole picture, as distinct from the figure, into our eye. I was too near the camera, it showed up all my wrinkles. Rene says she’ll take another, one day. Must send Ron one with Jean, Rene and I on. It is pretty good.

May, Emmie and Jean (front) - August 1943

May, Emmie and Jean (front) – August 1943

 The photograph was one of several taken in August 1943 (see also 24 Aug. 1943).

Have you read an introduction to May Hill & family (includes photographs) and explored ‘The Casualties Were Small’?