Sunday June 7/42 5.45 p.m.
# DIARY RESUMED AFTER TWO WEEK GAP
# WILL ON COASTGUARD BEACH PATROL
# ALLOTMENT POTATOES PLANTED AT LAST
# MORE PLANNING FOR RON’S WEDDING
# NEW COASTGUARD UNIFORMS
# THOUSAND BOMBER RAID ON COLOGNE
# ‘LUXURIOUS’ MEAL DEFIES RATIONING

I keep watering the s[weet] pea plants – hope to have some fine ones ready for their bouquets. Don’t think Ron ought to be expected to buy those but suppose he will have to buy Emmie’s and Joan [Smithurst]‘s. Have sent Jean’s tweed costume to [sister] Emily’s for Rene [Emily’s daughter] also her blue silk taffeta dress. Have got Jean green cotton taffeta for her new school dress. Miss B[aker] has taken my costume skirt in and I must shorten jacket sleeves. Mrs J Hall says she will try to get me icing sugar for cake. Hope she does. Jean has got a tray from Bernard, 7/6 made by blind. It is ply-wood with cane-work border and picture on p.w lacquered. Is not supposed to mark with heat.

We have carried out severe raids in Ger. particularly on Cologne (over 1,000) bombers one night. Woolton talks of food being more severely rationed. We don’t know any hardship here yet but the big towns feel it. I don’t feel very comfortable over this expensive wedding really. Much as we grumble I thought today our meals were almost luxurious. Bacon and egg and tea and bread and butter for breakfast, Roast beef, bk potatoes and mashed and cabbage, rhubarb and date pie with custard also rice pudding for dinner. For tea we had prunes and orange salad (a large S.A. [South African] orange), date cake, sultana cake, tho’ we did not cut it. Wht bread and fresh farm butter, cream from top of the milk to prunes. For supper, Father will probably have meat as he goes on watch at 2 a.m. and we have date rolls and remains of fruit pies and rice pudding. No scarcity there. I hope we hear from Ron tomorrow. I hate not to be in touch with him tho’ we must not grumble, he has been near us so long and is in robust health he says and feels very fit.

Mrs Pimperton was the wife of Wilf and mother of Jean’s friend Colleen (see 24 Mar. 1941).

Miss Baker, a dressmaker, lived with her niece Kathleen Moore (see 11 Jan. 1942).

Bernard, Daisy’s husband was himself blind. As a member of St Dunstan’s Association he made and traded in basketry items at ‘Glenholme’, a bungalow in South Road (near ‘Redcott’ – see Village Map) to which the family moved in 1942.

The first thousand bomber raid of the war took place on the night of 30/31 May 1942 with Cologne as the target.

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